Category Archives: Pistol

Magnum Research Upgrades BFR Series

Magnum Research (MRI) has updated its line of BFR (Big Frame Revolver) wheelguns.

All BFR special-ordered calibers, and all twelve BFR standard models with in .454 Casull, .44 Magnum, .30/30 Win, .45/70 Govt., .460 S&W, .500 S&W, and .45LC/.410, and with barrel lengths of 5 inches up to 10 inches will feature the new upgrades.

It all began in 1999, when an independent gunsmith/designer named Jim Tertin, was approached by MRI to manufacture the new large caliber revolver for them. Tertin mastered the base pin design, firing pin, barrels, frame and cylinder, and fine-tuned the timing of all BFR revolvers, and then put it into production for Magnum Research. In 2005, Tertin sold the BFR design to MRI and was hired by them as the Director of Manufacturing. His focus is now that of Director of Design, Research and Development for all MRI products including the iconic Desert Eagles and Baby Desert Eagles.
Among the changes:

The hammer spur is now taller and narrower than previous models. It was raised vertically, allowing for easier cocking. The new hammer is machined stainless steel and is made with extremely tight tolerances.

The BFR’s product line now employs a soft-rubber one-piece grip, with a taper suitable for single-action shooting. It is slightly longer than the original two-piece grip. The new Hogue grip is a brand new screwless design that has never before been offered on a single-action revolver. Each grip is shipped with an assembly/disassembly tool that aids in installing or removing the grip. The new grips and hammers will fit any BFR manufactured since 2000 and are available directly from Magnum Research.
The last new feature offered on the entire BFR product line is the new BFR logo. The logo was designed by Kevin Yoon, marketing manager for Kahr Firearms Group.

22plinkster vs Julie Golob

While in Missouri for the Federal Ambassador meeting, two world class pistol shooting champions went to the range to pit their skills against one another. 22plinkster, a long time friend of Midsouth shooters, and the fantastic Julie Golob went head-to-head to see who could split a card the fastest. It’s friendly competition at it’s finest! Check out the video below:

Stop by 22plinksters channel for more vs videos, and amazing trick shots by clicking here!

Are Carhartt Jackets Bulletproof? Video Says No

Rugged, durable and warm, Carhartt makes some of the finest working-man jackets on the market. However, if you ask the New York Police officers involved in the recent shooting of a knife-wielding man, they might say it’s too rugged. The New York Post reported earlier this week that officers fired nine shots at the man, four of which failed to penetrate his Carhartt jacket, raising the question, is Carhartt bulletproof?

But before you go grab your jacket from the closet, YouTuber ShootingTheBull410 put a new coat to the test with disappointing, but unsurprising results. So why the ammo failures with NYPD? Well, the Post has since reported the department is looking into malfunctioning ammo.

Got any ideas about what could explain the NYPD bullet failures? How does ammo malfunction to the point that it won’t penetrate a work jacket? Wrong powder charges?

Legality of the Cellphone Gun: Answer or Hang Up?

Shooters may have seen media coverage regarding the “cellphone gun,” which is a cellphone look-a-like that transforms into a firearm. The maker, IdealConceal.com, says, “The ground breaking Ideal Conceal is a carefully engineered double barreled .380 caliber people can safely carry in their purse or clipped to their side. Ingeniously designed to resemble a smartphone, yet with one click of the safety it opens and is ready to fire.”

IdealConceal.com's cellphone look-a-like transforms into a double-barreled .380 caliber firearm.
IdealConceal.com’s cellphone look-a-like transforms into a double-barreled .380 caliber firearm.

As it begins to enter production, many are asking, “Is it a legal handgun?”

To get these questions answered, we picked up the phone and shot some questions to Michele Byington, an attorney at the law firm of Walker & Byington in Houston.

“The main concern for this firearm is essentially whether or not it is a NFA regulated item,” Byington said. She elaborated that under the NFA (National Firearms Act), there are certain weapons that are felonies to possess without properly registering it with the ATF, and receiving a tax stamp.

A tax stamp is, according to Byington, “a special piece of paper the ATF gives you to prove you suffered through their registration process.”

One such item that must be registered is an “AOW,” or “Any Other Weapon.”

“But don’t freak out,” Byington says, “‘Any other weapon’ is not what it sounds like.” She went on to explain that the phrase AOW was sort of a catch-all category; the definition states that an AOW is “any weapon or device capable of being concealed on the person from which a shot can be discharged through the energy of an explosive.”

This term includes quite a few things, but the most important for this discussion includes the classification of cane guns, umbrella guns, and pen guns as AOWs. In other words, the term AOW includes items that seem like they come straight from a James Bond movie.

Byington said that, at first glance, this gun disguised as a cellphone could easily stand shoulder to shoulder with items such as umbrella guns, pen guns, and the like. “The only problem is that, when asked for clarification, the ATF stated that they waiting until the gun was actually manufactured before determining its classification.”

This means that if you bought the gun, and later the ATF ruled it was an AOW, you would be violating federal (and most likely, state) law until you registered the gun. “This isn’t a quick process either; the ATF’s turnaround time right now is between six and nine months, which is a long time to hope no one finds out you’re committing a federal felony,” Byington said.

Byington pointed out that it was equally possible the ATF could declare the cellphone gun not to be an AOW; but at the moment, no one can say with any certainty how this specific weapon will be viewed under the law, so it may be worth putting the purchase of a cellphone gun on hold until the gun’s status has been decided by ATF.

How do you think ATF will rule: Is the cellphone gun a regular old handgun, or the much-heavier-regulated AOW? Let’s hear your thoughts in the comments section below.

Five Things to Know About the Bianchi Cup

 

bianchi-cup-logoThe 2016 Bianchi Cup is scheduled to run through May 28, 2016 at the Green Valley Rifle and Pistol Club in Hallsville, Missouri. It is one of the crown jewels of shooting competition, and since its inception in 1979, the event has changed the landscape of competition shooting forever. First prize money in 2016 is $12,000, $2,250 for 2nd place, and $1,500 for third. Here are a few more fast facts about the Bianchi Cup:

1) Two men are primarily responsible for creating the Bianchi Cup: Ray Chapman and John Bianchi. The latter is the better known of the two, with Bianchi’s name long established as a holster maker, law-enforcement officer, and Hollywood cowboy. But as a law-enforcement officer and IPSC champion of the 1970s himself, Chapman was likewise integral in the creation of the event. Chapman passed away in 2008. The current shooting site at Green Valley Rifle and Pistol Club was formerly called the Chapman Training Academy.

2) The Bianchi Cup course of fire is a mixture of IPSC, Police Pistol Combat, and NRA Conventional Bullseye pistol-shooting styles. In 1984, the formal name of the event became the NRA Bianchi Cup, National Action Pistol Championship.

3) Citizens of any country may win the MidwayUSA & NRA Bianchi Cup Championship, except by those whose countries restrict participation and winning their championship to their own citizens.

4) The first of the four match sections is the Practical Event, followed by the Barricade Event, the Falling Plate Event, and the Moving Target Event.

5) Competitors are cautioned not to pick up dropped firearms unless under the direction of a tournament official. Dropping of an unloaded firearm and subsequently picking it up creates two safety violations and is reason for disqualification. Dropping an unloaded firearm is not sufficient reason for disqualification by itself, so competitors should contact a tournament official before picking up a dropped firearm.

To see results of this year’s competition, click here.

The Web’s New Rimfire Master: 22plinkster

If you haven’t taken the time to watch his videos, Click Here, settle in, and be prepared ask repeatedly, “How’d he do that?” and exclaim, “Holy Smokes, that was incredible!” We’re always excited to see what new challenge he’ll present himself, and his unique and entertaining approach in each video.

22plinkster

22plinkster has made his home on YouTube as more than just a trick-shot vlogger. He’s become one of the interwebs favorite firearm personalities. Check out the great article from our partners  at Federal Ammunition, and what they had to say about our friend, 22plinkster.

Click Here to read the entire story!

Do you have any suggestions on challenges for 22plinkster? Make your recommendations in the comments below!

Springfield Armory Releases Limited Edition Chris Kyle 1911 Legend Series TRP Pistol

Springfield Armory is pleased to announce the Legend Series Chris Kyle 1911 TRP Pistol. In cooperation with the Chris Kyle Foundation and the Chris Kyle family, the company aims to honor the spirit of American Sniper and Navy Seal Chris Kyle while providing direct support to the foundation. Continue reading Springfield Armory Releases Limited Edition Chris Kyle 1911 Legend Series TRP Pistol

Midsouth Shooters Crawfish Cup Part 2: Shooters Ready!

Many of our readers are reloaders. It takes a different mentality to submerse one’s self into creating something to be used or consumed. Farmers get it. Butchers understand. Carpenters, masons, builders, creators, doers all understand. When one works for something, and sees the fruits of their labor, they gain a level of respect beyond the intended use of their creation. Although we weren’t competing, we were allowed to get a glimpse of the work that goes into becoming a competitor in action pistol, and the be a participant in The Crawfish Cup.

Members of the Army Marksmanship Unit, plus Bruce Piatt and Tony Holmes find some shade on the Mover
Members of the Army Marksmanship Unit, plus Bruce Piatt and Tony Holmes find some shade on the Mover.

Friday, the practice ramped up, especially on the new mover. Shots rang out across the range from Tracie and Eli Rushing as they took on each station. First Timer at The Crawfish Cup, Tony Holmes greeted us with a smile, and many kind words, and set to work preparing himself for the match to come. It was amazing to see these titans of the sport, Doug Koenig, Bruce Piatt, Kevin Angstadt, and Tony Holmes gather together across a few tailgates, and not only discuss the course of fire, but rib each other like old friends.

Kevin Angstadt, Bruce Piatt, Doug Koenig, and Tony Holmes gather together on practice day.
Kevin Angstadt, Bruce Piatt, Doug Koenig, and Tony Holmes gather together on practice day.

Soon after, the laughter died away, and the calm of experience took over as each shooter set off for his or her area of desired challenge. It was at this point we saw where the training ethics play a major roll in action pistol. To even be able to hit these targets, whether they’re turning, zipping from side to side, or just falling down after they’re shot, is a feat. Being able to maintain the amount of X’s (shots in the bullseye location) each competitor racked up was astounding. We tried! We were invited to try the falling plates at 10 yards. No big deal, right?

It’s harder than it looks, and it should be. It takes work, training, and dedication. Furthermore, it takes discipline! To develop a level of control where one removes their own body as a variable, is what separates a professional from the rest of the lot.

 

The feeling of community pervaded the entire day, especially at dinner. We gathered at Big Daddy’s, a local fixture in Lake Charles. Shooters of all levels, old hands and new faces alike, gathered like family to demolish mud bugs, and discuss the competition ahead. The food, much like the company, was fantastic. Saturday loomed close, and in order for a nice crop of X’s to be harvested, the fun had to slip behind the barricade, and the work had to begin.

Kevin Angstadts 9x23 Easter Eggs
Kevin Angstadt’s 9×23 Easter Eggs (ammo)

The work would never have been possible without the generous sponsors providing prizes, donations, and support to the range, and the competitors. Check out the sponsor profile from the last newsletter here. A Special thank you goes out to the event sponsors! With their donations and support, the match will continue to flourish beyond the amazing progress already made to benefit the competitors experience.

sponsors wall at 2016 crawfish cup
Thank you to all of the sponsors!
The Secure Firearms Products Mover Event Featuring Sig Shooter Tracie Rushing
The Secure Firearms Products Mover Event Featuring Sig Shooter Tracie Rushing
The Lucas Oil Outdoor Products Falling Plates Event Featuring SFP Sponsored Shooter Mark Itzstein
The Lucas Oil Outdoor Products Falling Plates Event Featuring SFP Sponsored Shooter Mark Itzstein
The Briley Manufacturing Barricade Event Featuring Midsouth Shooter Kevin Angstadt
The Briley Manufacturing Barricade Event Featuring Midsouth Shooter Kevin Angstadt
The T.K. Custom Practical Shooting Event Featuring Moose Liming
The T.K. Custom Practical Shooting Event Featuring Moose Liming

Stay tuned for part 3 of the Crawfish Cup, where we take you into the heart of the big match! Was there a competitor you were rooting for? What do you think is the most common caliber on the range? Discuss in the comments below!

Midsouth Shooters Crawfish Cup Part 1: Welcome to Lake Charles!

2016 marks our first venture into action pistol, and it was an amazing experience, filled with great people. Action pistol is a sport, in every sense of the word. It takes a ridiculous amount of dedication, discipline, and attention in order to be a competitor.

Our group arrived in Lake Charles, LA to a torrential downpour. Thankfully, the clouds parted shortly after our arrival. In 2015, the competition, as well as the competitors, weren’t so lucky…

2015 Crawfish Cup monsoon
2015 Crawfish Cup monsoon

This year was blessedly cooperative weather-wise. The wide field of 87 competitors, ranging in all ages, and pistol varieties, were eager to get their feet wet on the course of fire, so to speak. Greeted by the range master, as well as the lead range officer, George Mowbray, and Gary Yantis, the heart and soul of the match. Their experience and expertise are only matched by their hospitality, and their willingness to impart any knowledge one wishes to gain about anything Crawfish Cup.

Range Master George Mowbray and Head Range Officer Gary Yantis
Range Master George Mowbray and Head Range Officer Gary Yantis

Gary and George, both pro pistol shooters with decades of experience between them, have built an amazing match thus far. In 2015, the match saw 70 competitors, with Bruce Piatt taking home the cup. 2014 had a similar field of competitors, with the Midsouth sponsored shooter, Kevin Angstadt raising the cup. 2013 had world class shooter Doug Koenig adding the Crawfish Cup to his trophy case. Every year saw outstanding competitors, and George and Gary making sure every competitor had a safe, fair, and fun competition. Having them to work with in preparation for 2017 only fuels our desire to exceed the progress we made this year in providing the best experience for every competitor on the road to the prestigious Bianchi Cup.

Click Here to check out the Gallery for this year’s Crawfish Cup!

Something that makes the Crawfish Cup special is the field of competition. We had the immense pleasure of meeting great people at every turn. Please head over to the competitor profile section to meet a few shooters from all over the U.S. Each one brought something special to the match. Also attending this year were the three members of the Yackley 5ive, Tim and Sean Yackley, and their mom, competitor Becky Yackley. These bright young men are the future of action pistol. We got the chance to bounce a few questions off them prior to the match:

Tim, Sean, and Becky Yackley
Meet Tim and Sean Yackley, and their mother, Becky Yackley.

Tim and Sean Yackley are not only involved in every aspect of action pistol, they take their dedication beyond Crawfish and Bianchi Cup, and into long range shooting, 3-gun, all the way down to working the reloading bench. When asked about their level of commitment to the shooting sports, they said, “One of the things that really makes us love shooting is seeing what we’ve been able to do with all the little things we’ve done:  we don’t have anyone training us, it’s a lot of our own work, over years.  As kids, it’s neat to see the tiny bits of work we do with each other turn into a great performance – stuff like working on particular skills and seeing that help each other in a match, or taking a small piece of advice someone gave us on say, shooting barricades, and seeing it play a role in something we figure out and can grow from – those things really make the little parts of everything we’ve done, with help from lots of people come into play.”

These Lucas Oil Outdoor sponsored shooters are already making a name for themselves. Tim Yackley took home first place in the Master Category, at age 13! Proof positive of a stellar career in shooting sports, and a definite presence at The Crawfish Cup.

Team Cerino stands out, and it’s not just because of Michelle’s tiara. Chris and Michelle are fierce competitors, and have a great rapport with every other shooter they encounter, adding a level of fun to each section of the match that we had no idea could exist in such a regimented structure.

Chris and Michelle Cerino
Chris and Michelle Cerino on match day at 2016 Crawfish Cup

Vera Koo is not only a shooter of legend, she’s a true ambassador to the sport. Earning High Lady, and Grand High Lady this year at the cup was a great achievement. Beyond that, she donated $300 of her own money to be divided up, and given as door prizes to other shooters.

Vera Koo heads to her next match
Vera Koo, Grand High Lady recipient heads to the next stage of the match

See, it’s the elements that lie underneath the surface of the competition. These acts of comeradery, generosity, and respect are what propel The Crawfish Cup to the next level.

Check out part 2 for more on the individual matches, competitor interactions, and information on the 2016 Crawfish Cup and their sponsors!

Have you participated in Action Pistol, or any other shooting competition? Tell us about it in the comments below!

Ten Essential Tips for CCW Holders

10-CCW-Tips_Page_01Beretta’s free e-book, Ten Essential Tips for CCW Holders, has some useful tips to consider, in particular for gunowners who are contemplating the pros and cons of everyday carry for themselves.

As the Beretta CCW booklet says, “Carrying a concealed handgun requires a certain amount of confidence. You need to be confident in your knowledge of laws and regulations. You have to have confidence in your accuracy, and you need to trust that you can carry a gun effectively, securely and comfortably. If a gun is a burden for you to carry, you probably won’t.” So far, so good.

Click here to download 10 Essential Tips for CCW Holders as a PDF.

The topics covered are:

  1. Introduction
  2. Knowing How to Carry Your Gun Comfortably and Effectively
  3. Dressing to Keep Your Weapon a Secret
  4. Understand Your Weapon’s Capabilities
  5. Choose a Suitable Caliber
  6. Practicing Basic Skills
  7. Try Your Hand at Point Shooting
  8. Training to Clear Your Weapon
  9. Stage Your Weapon
  10. Closing to Engage a Threat

And Beretta offers some additional information which may be of value to our customers who are considering making the move to concealed carry:

  • 55% of gunfights take place 0-5 feet.
  • 20% of gunfights take place in 5-10 feet.
  • 20% of gunfights take place in 10-21 feet.
  • 95% of gunfights take place in 0-21 feet. (Source: FBI)
  • The average man can cover 21 feet of ground in 1.5 seconds.
  • The average man cannot draw a gun from concealment in under 2 seconds.
  • The average gunfight is over in 3-5 seconds.
  • 3 to 4 shots are usually fired.
  • Most gunfights take place in low-light conditions.
  • On average, one shot in four strikes someone.

Here are three of the ten tips in more detail:

Dressing to Keep Your Weapon a Secret

Once you’ve chosen a holster and a gun, you have to hide them both. The trick is keeping the gun both concealed and accessible. The main give-away is the gun’s outline being visible through clothing (printing). Some tips on choosing the right clothing to carry concealed:

  • Wear pants that have enough room in the pocket or in the waist band to comfortably carry the gun.
  • Shirt tails provide good coverage. Wear shirts that are meant to be worn untucked, and make sure your shirt extends past your waistband.
  • If you will be wearing shorts and T-shirts, you will have to consider carrying a small gun. A slim gun in an IWB holster should easily be covered by a shirt.
  • In fall and winter, heavy clothing will allow the concealment of even full sized handguns.
  • Suit jackets and coats make concealment easy.

Choose a Suitable Caliber

Here the rules are easy to understand. Larger rounds require larger guns, and typically do more damage. Small-framed handguns with short grips can be difficult to grasp. But larger guns are harder to conceal. Again, there is a balance that must be considered.

  • The .25 ACP is a tiny round that is fired from tiny guns. While easily concealed, the .25 ACP is not known for its stopping power.
  • The .32 ACP is moderately larger, and can be a perfectly effective round (though most consider a .32 to be a backup for a larger gun).
  • The .380 ACP is a very popular choice. The .380’s recoil is manageable, which allows for more accurate repeat shots. And many ammunition manufacturers make excellent .380 defensive rounds.
  • The 9mm is very popular, and close to the upper limit for lightweight concealed carry.
  • The .40 S&W is slightly larger, still. It is a popular choice for many law enforcement agencies.
  • The .45 ACP is a venerable handgun round, and offers excellent stopping power, though it is a bit slower than the 9mm.
  • The 10mm is seen by many as the upper limit of practicality. It is a .40-caliber bullet backed by more powder.

Many feel like the debate over caliber misses the mark. Practice, skill, and accuracy will do more for your success than a big bullet. Look for a gun that’s easily concealed in a caliber you can confidently handle and work on your shot placement.

Training to Clear Your Weapon of a Malfunction

What can go wrong will go wrong, and that applies to handguns as well. Sometimes primers don’t ignite the powder. Or the bullet will fire, but the gun won’t extract the spent brass. Or the next round won’t feed quite right. Anytime this happens, you have to fix the problem. Try a tap-rack. Pull the slide back with your non-dominant hand, hard, and let it go again, like you would if you were chambering a round. Sometimes a little shake will free a loose piece of brass. When the slide falls, it usually picks up the next round, or may push a stuck round into place.

This is easily practiced. Snap-caps and/or dummy rounds will allow you to simulate these problems without live rounds in the gun. See how easy (or hard) jams are to clear, and how quickly you can do it. Keep practicing these drills until the tap-rack becomes second nature.

In the worst case scenarios, you will need to lock the slide back and drop the magazine in order to clear the issue. Practice this, too. Your life may depend on your ability to understand the problem and fix it quickly.

When you decided to begin daily carry, what was the biggest obstacle for you personally to overcome? Let us hear your thoughts in the comments section below: